Monthly Archives: December, 2010

Transcibe, Transliterate, and Translate

We must translate between languages, but if a language uses a different script than our own script, we must also consider transliteration and transcription.  Thus, when writing about a Tibetan word, the writer has three choices: Translation:  Faithful to the meaning:  come up with some English word/phrase whose meaning or use best matches the use …

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Tibetan Scripts

Diagrams help me remember. Here is my understanding of the various Tibetan Scripts. Read Tashi’s posts (below) for details. Sources from Tashi Mannox (master calligrapher): Ink Essential Tattoo site Ink Essential Blog

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“Every lama his own doctrine”

I found the following interesting Tibetan proverb: “Every district its own dialect; Every lama his own doctrine.” -a Tibetan proverb Turrell Wylie quoted this proverb in his 1959 article in the Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies where he humorously added this next line: “Every scholar his own transcription” -Wylie, 1959 Interestingly, it is Wylie’s Tibetan …

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Virtue Meditation

Above is a visual model for a method of combining the four immeasurable virtues in one meditation. Buddhism has many meditative practices — each with different results. Each tradition emphasizes different practices and adds their own flavors. ” Virtue meditation” or “virtue contemplation” is common to many traditions. In the Vajrayāna tradition, meditation on the …

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Two wings to fly

“Understand that, just as a bird needs two wings to fly, you must develop wisdom and compassion simultaneously.  Wisdom is a correct understanding of reality and compassion is the desire for all beings to be liberated from the causes of suffering.” — Ricard, 2008 p87 Matthieu Ricard trained for years in Tibet, so I found …

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Tibetan Flash Cards

I love flash cards.  Here are some very simple cards to learn the Tibetan Script (pdf):  Sabio’s Tibetan Script Flash Card.  Below is the key to explain each side of the flash card.  Cut the paper, fold and paste.  Below is the key to explain both sides of the cards. “Wylie” is the most common …

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Classifying Tibetan

Below I will illustrate two ways of classifying languages:  (1) by their writing and (2) by their grammar/vocabulary.  The first is called “orthography” and the second is called “language family”.   To study Tibetan Buddhism, knowing a bit about its orthography (writing system) can be helpful especially as you will see inconsistent spellings between books on …

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Mac Transliteration Shortcuts

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American Buddhism Diagram

I have created the above diagram for a friend who is recently considering visiting Buddhist groups in the USA. I hope this chart helps add some order to his understanding of the myriad of Buddhist Schools in America. My goal was to keep the diagram fairly simple, name the big groups, and show classification according …

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Yāna Classification

Buddhism, like all religions, has naturally proliferated into many sects.  I don’t use “sect” pejoratively at all, but instead as a religious-studies term.  Christians invented the pejorative connotation with “sect” and thus don’t refer to their own sub-groups as “sects” but instead uses the term “denominations”.  Buddhists have various ways of describing their own sects. …

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Types of Dzogchen

To assist my visual learning I have put together this diagram to explain how “Dzogchen” is seen in the Aro lineage of Nyingma.  All corrections, suggestions and kudos are appreciated. Resources: Learn Aro Meditation rDzogs Chen: the importance of Sem-dé by Khandro Déchen

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